The Dogon: African tribe or space aliens from Sirius B?

dogon dance

It turns out the Scientologists aren’t the only ones who claim we come from space. The Dogon – an indigenous tribe of Mali – claim that the germ of all things originated in a super-dense “egg of the world”—what we now know as the star “Sirius B.” Sirius B is the twin to Sirius, the so-called “Dogstar,” the brightest star in the constellation Canis Major.

But the real kicker is that the Dogon made their claim in the 1940s. And a diagram for the Sirius system is shown in Dogon artifacts over 400 years-old. Sirius B wasn’t even discovered by astronomers until 1970. So how did the Dogon know it was there?

To answer that question, we need to take a look at Dogon creation myths. But first a warning – these may not be appropriate for all readers.

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On a clear night, you can see Uranus

Uranus with orbit

As proof that first impressions can be misleading, one need not look further than Uranus.  After the spacecraft Voyager 2 visited Uranus in 1986, it was dubbed “the most boring planet” in the Solar System. But recent photos from the Hubble Telescope reveal that Uranus is not as dull as once imagined.

For one thing, Uranus is the only planet other than Venus with a retrograde (i.e., clockwise) orbit.  Unlike the other planets of the solar system, however, Uranus is tilted almost all the way over on its axis.  Essentially, it orbits the sun on its side. Astronomers hypothesize that this unusual orientation might be due to a collision with a planet-sized body soon after Uranus was formed.

Because of its unusual axial tilt, each pole gets around 42 years of continuous sunlight, followed by 42 years of darkness.  (A year on Uranus is equal to 84 years on Earth). Bizarrely, however, even though the poles receive more sun than the equator, Uranus is – for unknown reasons — hotter at its equator than at its poles.
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What Exactly is a “Blue Moon”?

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The phrase “blue moon” is used metaphorically to refer to a rare event, as in the expression “once in a blue moon.”  It has nothing to do with the actual color of the moon, although any moon can appear blue if the air is full of particles from volcanic eruptions or forest fires.

A “blue moon” is usually defined as the second full moon occurring during a calendar month. But until 1946, a “blue moon” was the third full moon in any season in which there were four full moons.  It was a sort of Leap Day for moons, necessitated by the fact that the average lunar cycle is 29.53 days, slightly shorter than an average month.

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