An eye for an eye: the Code of Hammurabi

Hammurabi (standing), receiving his royal insignia from the god Shamash (relief on the upper portion of the stele of Hammurabi's Code, the Louvre Museum, Paris).

Hammurabi (standing), receiving his royal insignia from the god Shamash. (relief on the stele of Hammurabi’s Code, in the Louvre Museum, Paris).

Hammurabi was the sixth king of the First (Amorite) Dynasty of Babylon. He reigned for 43 years — from 1792–1750 BCE – over most of ancient Mesopotamia. He is best known for the Code of Hammurabi — 282 laws covering everything from medical malpractice to a minimum wage.

Contrary to popular belief, the Code of Hammurabi is not the oldest known written code of laws. That honor belongs to the Code of Ur-Nammu, written in the Sumerian language in Mesopotamia during the 21st century BCE.

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Gertrude Bell: the “Uncrowned Queen of Iraq”

From left to right, beneath the face of the Sphinx: Winston Churchhill, Gertrude Bell, and T.E. Lawrence, Cairo, Egypt, 1921.

T.E. Lawrence — best known as Lawrence of Arabia — gets all the press.  But Gertrude Bell — who worked with Lawrence in Cairo – was, like Lawrence, an archaeologist, intelligence agent and author.  Like Lawrence, her sex life – or lack thereof – has been the subject of much debate.  And like Lawrence, Bell – who has been called the “Uncrowned Queen of Iraq — for better or worse helped define and shape the modern Middle East.

Bell was born in England on July 14, 1868 to a wealthy family.  After earning a degree in history from Oxford University, she began to travel.  She established a reputation as a skilled mountain climber, and is credited with 10 first ascents in the Bernese Alps. These include the Gertrudspitze, which was named for her.

Bell’s greatest fame as a climber, however, came from a failed attempt.  It was to have been a first ascent of the northeast face of 14,000-ft. Finsteraarhorn.  But an unexpected blizzard trapped Bell and two companions on the mountain.  Through freezing temperatures and lightning storms, they survived roped together for 53 hours.

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